Somewhere to Sit

As befits a city with a tropical climate, in Kuala Lumpur there is always somewhere to sit and, for a small price, slurp a well-spiced laksa or an earthy teh tarik. Indoors, outdoors, it doesn’t really matter — with restaurants spilling into the street and hawker stalls operating inside restaurants, there’s very little distinction between […]

Posted in: Asia Pacific, Interior Space, Public Space by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Somewhere to Sit , , ,

Photo of the Week: Eshete

This week’s photos were taken Chris Arnade in Brooklyn. He writes: I have known Eshete, the “cat man” of Columbia St. for over three years, walking by almost daily, and look forward to our chats. Despite having some serious issues, he has always been super sweet and nice to me. He is obsessed with his […]

Neon’s Slow Exit from Hong Kong

Yue Hwa in 2005. Photo by choco_late The Yue Hwa Chinese Products department store has stood at the corner of Jordan and Nathan roads for decades — and for decades, so did its big neon sign, a sentinel that marked the passage north into the seedy streets of Yau Ma Tei and Mong Kok. Sometime […]

Posted in: Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Canada, Heritage and Preservation, History, Society and Culture by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Neon’s Slow Exit from Hong Kong , , , , ,

Urban Pastoral

It comes to me whenever I am in Vancouver: an urge to watch the sunset. Pulled by memories of blue Pacific waters buffeting a tangerine sky, I make my way to English Bay Beach, where I find a seat on one of the large pieces of driftwood that have been arranged on the sand, and […]

Looking for Life in Puerto Madero

The walk from the Plaza de Mayo, the political heart of Buenos Aires, to Puerto Madero, its redeveloped waterfront, begins inauspiciously. Cars barrel down multilane boulevards devoid of people; a weed-strewn lot slated to become a monument to the country’s deeply-loved former president, Juan Perón, lies unconvincingly fallow. Then there are the railroad tracks severing […]

Photos of the Week: ATM

This week’s photos were taken along the Brighton Beach boardwalk in New York by Keith Goldstein.

Posted in: Public Space, United States by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Photos of the Week: ATM , , ,

Walk This Way

Maya Barkai’s crowdsourced art installation has brought pedestrian crossing symbols from around the world to New York’s streets Only a block north from the construction barriers surrounding the former site of the World Trade Center, which brim with boastful renderings of progress on the nearly-complete September 11th Memorial, another, less conspicuous hole opens up in […]

Prairie Skies Come to the City

Well known for snowy summers and minuteman weather tantrums, Calgary was treated to some magnificent cloud cover after this Thursday’s storm.

Posted in: Canada by Karl Leung Comments Off on Prairie Skies Come to the City

Make Your Own Public Space

No cycling. No ball-playing. No gambling. No remote-controlled vehicles. No walking on the grass. No fun. Hong Kong’s public parks are burdened by so many rules, they end up discouraging the very thing that parks are meant to provide: an escape from the many stresses of urban life. The same is true for many of […]

The Robson Street Lawn

Vancouver is working hard to shake off its reputation as a somewhat pious city that values good mountain views over vibrant streetlife. Its architecture has seen a shift away from the back-to-nature style of the 1970s, 80s and 90s towards something bolder and more urban, like the recently-completed Woodwards redevelopment. There seems to be more […]

Posted in: Architecture, Art and Design, Canada, Public Space, Society and Culture, Video by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on The Robson Street Lawn , , , ,

Photos of the Week: Step by Step

This week’s photos were taken by tribensee on Wall Street in New York.

Posted in: United States by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Photos of the Week: Step by Step , , ,

How to Bike Around Montreal in 1897

The modern bicycle was invented in the 1860s, but it wasn’t until the “safety bicycle” was introduced in the 1890s that cycling really caught on. The new bikes featured chain-drive transmission, pneumatic tires, a metal frame and two small wheels of equal size; they were exponentially more comfortable than the bulky, bone-shaking dandy horses and […]

Posted in: Canada, Public Space, Society and Culture, Transportation by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on How to Bike Around Montreal in 1897 , , , , , ,

Photos of the Week: Straight Shooter

This week’s photos were taken in Glasgow by Stephen Cosh and in New York by Camille Beckles. Cosh writes: This guy always plays in Buchanan Street. His guitar playing is first rate but his singing is pretty poor. He saw me taking his picture and nodded towards his guitar bag, hinting at me to donate […]