Archive for July, 2016

July 25th, 2016

How Hong Kong Forgot the Battle to Save It

samsonyoung

Artwork by Samson Young, based on a World War II journal entry

When there is a bomb scare in Hong Kong, it usually doesn’t have anything to do with modern-day terrorism. It’s more often a reminder of World War II. In February 2014, construction workers in Happy Valley unearthed an unexploded 2,000-pound American bomb that had been dropped on Hong Kong during the final days of its occupation by the Japanese. Police superintendent Jimmy Yuen arrived to find a potentially disastrous situation: the bomb was surrounded by a hotel, schools, a hospital and a Sikh temple. Moving it was out of the question; so was a controlled explosion, because the bomb was so powerful. Yuen and his team decided they would need to create two small holes in the bomb so they could defuse it. They worked through the night, carefully cutting through the bomb’s shell, stopping whenever their equipment made the surface too hot. They finally succeeded after nine hours of work, defusing the bomb just in time for the morning rush hour.

Though its size was unparalleled, this was hardly the only World War II bomb discovered in Hong Kong. In 2015 alone, police discovered four unexploded grenades, three Japanese bombs, a mortar and 54 rounds of ammunition in the country parks that surround the city’s residential areas. Another bomb discovered by construction workers in Victoria Park—the city’s largest urban green space—took three days of preparation to destroy in a controlled explosion.

Hong Kong is a city that constantly remakes itself: in many parts of town, each plot of land has been redeveloped three, four or even five times over the past century. The frenzied street markets and glossy shopping malls don’t offer many opportunities to reflect on the past, let alone the time in 1941 when Hong Kong was the site of an intense battle between Allied forces and Japanese invaders. Like the bombs, the history of the war has long been ignored and forgotten – but it is finally coming back to the surface.

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