Open Doors in Phnom Penh

We’re happy to introduce our newest contributor, Yin Khvat. Yin was born in Manchester in the UK and has lived in Australia for the last six years. She is currently on a short stay in Taiwan and has a particular interest in Cambodia. Photo by Bo Nielsen A woman is selling green coconuts off the […]

Posted in: Asia Pacific, Europe, Public Space, Society and Culture by Yin Khvat Comments Off on Open Doors in Phnom Penh , , , ,

Regrowth or Replacement?

HK Farm. Photo by Glenn Eugen Ellingsen Sweating in the bright Mediterranean sun, Glenn Eugen Ellingsen surveyed a little bit of Hong Kong in Venice. “It’s meant to be very organic,” he said, pointing to an array of wood planters, metal racks, video screens and exposed electrical wires. Ellingsen is one of the founders of […]

Revisiting the Fortress Embassy

Security forces intervene during the protests at US Embassy Cairo. Photo by Gigi Ibrahim. There are probably at least a few in your city, hiding on the upper floods of office buildings, secluded in elegant townhouses, tucked somewhere behind high fences out of view. Nearby cars’ license plates are sometimes their only identifiable feature. Whether […]

Posted in: Africa and Middle East, Architecture, Books, Europe, Politics by Christopher Szabla Comments Off on Revisiting the Fortress Embassy , , , , ,

Cicchetti veneziani

There’s always a disconnect between the way a city is portrayed on screen and the day-to-day reality of its existence. New York isn’t actually surly taxi drivers and whistling construction workers; you can’t see the Eiffel Tower from every street in Paris. But Venice is the exception. There is nowhere else like it. What’s more, […]

As The Romans Do

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Pastoralympics

Wait, that’s not an Olympic sport! Photo courtesy UK Department of Culture, Media, and Sport Texted, tweeted, teasing browsers of a hundred “sneak preview” slideshows ─ in short, serving as the centerpiece of endless international speculation for weeks prior to its debut ─ the verdant green fields on which the curtain of the 2012 Olympics […]

Posted in: Europe, History, Public Space, Society and Culture by Christopher Szabla Comments Off on Pastoralympics , , , , , , ,

The Faded Glory of Not-So-Ancient Rome

Posted in: Architecture, Europe by Christopher Szabla Comments Off on The Faded Glory of Not-So-Ancient Rome , ,

Porto Defeated Me

Porto. The city was called Portus in imperial times, and all of Portugal now bears its name. A merchant city with an urban fabric that sometimes seems to break down, metamorphosing. A medieval Cathedral that overlooks a hill that seems to be inhabited by darkness and fear. Some prostitutes, few tourists. In February 2012, Porto […]

Posted in: Europe by Daniel Corbeil 2 Comments , ,

Istanbul: To the Asian Side

Photo by Engin Kurutepe For an intercontinental journey, F.’s directions were fairly straightforward. “Head to Eminönü,” she’d said, introducing a thicket of tongue-challenging Turkish umlauts. “Take a ferry to Kadiköy. I’ll meet you there, on the Asian side.” The Asian side: nowhere else in the world can you pass between continents without so much as […]

A Weekday in Lisboa

Lisbon was said to have been founded by Ulysses. It was an ancient Roman city, then a palatial city of the Moors, with a hundred thousand souls living in the hills of the Alfama, while Paris was still a small and frozen town. Theatre of the terrible earthquake of 1755, which, people in the streets […]

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In Front of the Theatre

It’s always a pleasure to wander around an unfamiliar city and come across a corner where the entire place seems to come together. In Palermo, that would be the plaza in front of the Teatro Politeama Garibaldi, a robust circular structure built in the 1870s. The theatre sits at the point where the Belle Époque […]

Posted in: Europe by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on In Front of the Theatre , , , ,

Parking in Palermo

Palermo was a surprise. I didn’t know what to expect, because the only images I had in my head were the Sicilian gangsters of early 20th century America and the assassination of Mary Corleone in The Godfather Part III, which took place on the steps of the Teatro Massimo, Italy’s biggest opera house and one […]

Photos of the Week: Mechanical Athens

This week’s photos were taken by Spiros K in Athens. These are just some of the striking images in our Urbanphoto group on Flickr. Want to see your photos here? Join the group.

Posted in: Europe, Interior Space by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Photos of the Week: Mechanical Athens ,

La dignité d’un Portugal en tutelle

Chronique d’un court séjour au Portugal, sur fond de crise économique… C’est dimanche, mi-février 2012. Comme les quelques touristes perdus dans une Lisbonne hivernale, je profite de la journée pour aller visiter Belem et son fameux monastère. Débarquant à la station Cais-do-Sodré, je découvre cette marée humaine qui domine les rues, les monuments, les rails. […]

Posted in: Europe, Politics, Society and Culture by Daniel Corbeil Comments Off on La dignité d’un Portugal en tutelle , , , ,