A City Beyond Its Borders

Halfway through director Heiward Mak’s new short film, SAR², Eric Tsang takes a tumble in front of a propaganda sign in Shenzhen’s Qianhai new development zone. “Supported by Hong Kong, Serving the Mainland, Facing the World,” reads the billboard, reflecting the area’s goal of attracting 100,000 Hong Kong permanent residents to live and work there. […]

The City Without Light

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWjRkHsGzNM[/youtube] Two weeks ago, as Hong Kong was swept under the tide of bacchanalia known as Art Week — basically a non-stop stream of parties and other well-lubricated events revolving around Art Basel Hong Kong — something remarkable happened to the city’s tallest building. Normally, the 484-metre-tall International Commerce Centre is illuminated by an unceasingly […]

A Police Dormitory Reborn as a Design Hub

Hong Kong’s design scene is thriving, but like many of this city’s creative endeavours, it exists beyond the spotlight, in old factory buildings and back alley studios. That could soon change. After two years of renovations, the former Police Married Quarters on Aberdeen Street has been reborn as PMQ, a design hub that aims to […]

Posted in: Architecture, Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Heritage and Preservation, Interior Space, Public Space by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on A Police Dormitory Reborn as a Design Hub , , , , , ,

Casting New Light on Architecture

Rendering of M+ In Hong Kong, a city with an increasingly toxic political atmosphere, where the future looks uncertain and just about every small endeavour is greeted by controversy, M+ is one of the few bright spots on the horizon. That’s not to say the 60,000-square-metre, HK$5 billion museum of visual culture has enjoyed a […]

Posted in: Architecture, Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Interior Space, Society and Culture by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Casting New Light on Architecture , , , ,

The Best Tram in the World

As the tram lurched past the dried seafood shops of Des Voeux Road, a cool breeze passing through its open windows, passengers were served a round of cocktails. “Do you reckon this is the best tram in the world at the moment?” asked one woman sipping an Old Fashioned. “I think so,” replied another. Needless […]

Neon Gets Its Due

For decades, neon has defined Hong Kong’s cityscape, bathing its skyscraper canyons in rainbow hues that have provided a memorable backdrop to films like Chungking Express and The World of Suzie Wong – and inspiration for classics such as Blade Runner. But Hong Kong’s neon signs are starting to vanish, which has prompted the city’s […]

Posted in: Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Heritage and Preservation, History, Public Space by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Neon Gets Its Due , , , , ,

The Seedy and the Debased

The week I moved to Hong Kong, I went to the Peak. It’s what you’re supposed to do when you’re a first-time visitor or recent arrival to the city: take the tram, bus or (if you’re a little more savvy) minibus up to the cluster of shopping malls that has risen from what was once […]

Posted in: Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Heritage and Preservation, Public Space, Society and Culture by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on The Seedy and the Debased , , , ,

Bring in the Year of the Horse

Two weeks before Chinese New Year, the floor creaks as Sunny Yim walks through the bamboo theatre he has helped build. A few of his wiry colleagues stand on a platform, making adjustments to the lattice of bamboo rods that is holding this cavernous structure aloft, but the work is mostly done. Yim, a compact […]

The Florida Pitch

Richard Florida strides across the stage in a sharply tailored suit, his voice rising and falling with the cadence of a preacher or a motivational speaker. “Every little boy and girl, every one of your sons and daughters, every one of your grandkids, each and every human being has a deep reservoir of creativity,” he […]

The Quiet Modernist

Jardine House (right). Photo by See-ming Lee It’s late on a Monday afternoon and James Kinoshita is sitting at home in Hong Kong’s Sai Kung district with his son, Andrew. Overhead is a tile roof that slopes towards a garden of blooming azalea and bougainvillea; just beyond are the placid waters of Port Shelter. James […]

A City on Edge

Protest at the opening of UABB. Photo by Espen Cook Last week in Kwun Tong, Kacey Wong stood inside a burnt wood cocoon, explaining the concept behind his painstakingly hand-made installation. “I wanted to create a place where people could meet quietly and have a greater understanding of what’s going on,” he said. To access […]

150 Years Ago in Hong Kong

Victoria Peak seen from Kellett Island Last week, an exhibition of images by 19th century Scottish photographer John Thomson opened at the Hong Kong Maritime Museum, including 22 photos of Hong Kong in the 1860s that have never been exhibited here before. I’ve written a story about the photos and their journey to Hong Kong […]

Future Festivals

Clockenflap 2012. Photo by Chris Lusher Construction has only just begun on Hong Kong’s multi-billion-dollar West Kowloon Cultural District, but the 100-acre waterfront site has already become the city’s most coveted venue for outdoor events, with a string of festivals set to take place over the next three weeks. Among them are Clockenflap, a three-day […]

Mapped: Hong Kong’s Public Steps

The photos I posted last week of Hong Kong’s hilly streets reminded me of a conversation I had more than a year ago with Melissa Cate Christ, who works at the University of Hong Kong’s architecture school. Christ is leading an investigation into the many public staircases and “ladder streets” on the north side of […]