Walking in the City Without Ground

One of the first lessons of walking in Hong Kong: maps are your enemy. In a city with such dramatic topography, where private and public spaces blend together almost seamlessly, the best routes are not the most obvious. Take for example the 20-minute walk from the cafés of Star Street to the shops of Queen’s […]

Posted in: Architecture, Asia Pacific, Environment, Interior Space, Public Space by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on Walking in the City Without Ground , , , , ,

A City Without Streets

Not too long ago, on a particularly glorious Sunday afternoon — the kind of sunny but cool day that happens all too rarely in Hong Kong — I took the MTR out to Po Lam station in Tseung Kwan O. Leaving the station, I walked along a linear park built atop the MTR tracks, which […]

La ville à l’échelle animale

Bobo-Dioulasso. Photo : Matthew Bradley Il est commun maintenant de dire d’une ville qu’elle est à l’échelle humaine. Il s’agit plutôt d’un compliment, généralement, mais a-t-on déjà vu une ville à l’échelle animale ? Je réponds oui, et j’y ai vécu un court instant. Il s’agit de Bobo-Dioulasso, une ville du Burkina Faso, petite en […]

Posted in: Africa and Middle East, Environment, Public Space, Society and Culture by Jean-Mathieu Nichols Comments Off on La ville à l’échelle animale , , , ,

The Sacred Food Court

Seats of imperial power are often regarded with a certain reverence — they provoke admiration, astonishment, even fear. That’s certainly the case in New Delhi, where British colonialists built a series of massive, belittling monuments to their rule, or in Washington, DC, where the Mall is increasingly seen by its National Park Service administrators not […]

Free at Last

When the Hong Kong public was invited to choose a master plan for the West Kowloon Cultural District, they were met by ambitious presentations from each of the proposals. The most sophisticated pitch of all came from Norman Foster’s office, which provided seductively realistic renderings of their City Park concept, which included grassy meadows overlooking […]

Vie napolitani

Piazza San Domenico Maggiore, au coeur du dédale du vieux coeur greco-romain napoliain. Assis à la terrasse du Gran Caffè Napolis, un mouvement soudain de vie me surprend par son intensité. C’est vrai que les cloches sonnent l’arrivée de la longue pause de la mi-journée. De nombreux ménestrels nouveau genre envahissent un bon cinquième de […]

Posted in: Europe by Daniel Corbeil Comments Off on Vie napolitani , , ,

Open Doors in Phnom Penh

We’re happy to introduce our newest contributor, Yin Khvat. Yin was born in Manchester in the UK and has lived in Australia for the last six years. She is currently on a short stay in Taiwan and has a particular interest in Cambodia. Photo by Bo Nielsen A woman is selling green coconuts off the […]

Posted in: Asia Pacific, Europe, Public Space, Society and Culture by Yin Khvat Comments Off on Open Doors in Phnom Penh , , , ,

COB on Calle Florida

It may share a name with a certain sedated, semitropical retirement home of a state to its north, but nowhere is the raw verve of Buenos Aires more palpable than on Calle Florida. In a city of Brobdingnagian boulevards, it’s as claustrophobic as an Istanbul alley. Whereas most of Argentina’s capital is a blend of […]

Cicchetti veneziani

There’s always a disconnect between the way a city is portrayed on screen and the day-to-day reality of its existence. New York isn’t actually surly taxi drivers and whistling construction workers; you can’t see the Eiffel Tower from every street in Paris. But Venice is the exception. There is nowhere else like it. What’s more, […]

As The Romans Do

Posted in: Europe by Christopher Szabla Comments Off on As The Romans Do , ,

August 25, Three Decades Apart

Last week, the Archives de la Ville de Montréal uploaded a short series of photos taken on August 25, 1969, around Ste. Catherine and Sherbrooke streets. I’m always a fan of vintage street photography, especially from the relatively recent past, but these struck a real chord with me for one reason: it was on that […]

Posted in: Canada, History by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on August 25, Three Decades Apart , , ,

Hawkerama

Michael Leung’s “Good Morning” towels were a welcome sight. It was a scorching day on Fa Yuen Street, one of Hong Kong’s most popular street markets, and the energetic young product designer was inviting passersby to take part in a game at his market stall, Hoi Tung (“We’re open”). If you managed to use long […]

Hawker City

Not long ago, I was wandering around Kwun Tong trying to find an Indonesian restaurant. I arrived outside its front door only to find the shutter drawn, with a notice from the Urban Renewal Authority announcing that the property had been acquired for redevelopment. Then I looked around: nearly every storefront on the street was […]

A Weekday in Lisboa

Lisbon was said to have been founded by Ulysses. It was an ancient Roman city, then a palatial city of the Moors, with a hundred thousand souls living in the hills of the Alfama, while Paris was still a small and frozen town. Theatre of the terrible earthquake of 1755, which, people in the streets […]

Posted in: Europe by Daniel Corbeil Comments Off on A Weekday in Lisboa , , ,