On the Waterfront: Central Ferry Piers, Cheung Chau Praya

This is the last in a series of three posts about Hong Kong’s waterfront public spaces. Read the first one here and the second here. The promenade that runs for 850 metres along the Central ferry piers is one of the best public spaces in Hong Kong. I suspect this partly by accident. In the […]

Posted in: Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Public Space, Society and Culture by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on On the Waterfront: Central Ferry Piers, Cheung Chau Praya , , , , , ,

On the Waterfront: Kwun Tong, Ma On Shan

Second in a series of three posts about Hong Kong’s waterfront. Read the first post here. The Kwun Tong promenade opened last year on an industrial stretch of waterfront facing the runway of the old Kai Tak Airport. It’s very short — just 200 metres — but the plan is to continue expanding it until […]

Posted in: Architecture, Art and Design, Asia Pacific, Public Space, Society and Culture by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on On the Waterfront: Kwun Tong, Ma On Shan , , , , , ,

On the Waterfront: Tsim Sha Tsui

For a city defined by its harbour, Hong Kong has done a remarkable job of blocking people off from it. Highways, private development, cargo yards and storage depots take up more than 60 percent of Victoria Harbour’s shorelines. The rest of the harbourfront is a higgledy-piggledy network of disjointed promenades, some better than others. Luckily, […]

Looking for Life in Puerto Madero

The walk from the Plaza de Mayo, the political heart of Buenos Aires, to Puerto Madero, its redeveloped waterfront, begins inauspiciously. Cars barrel down multilane boulevards devoid of people; a weed-strewn lot slated to become a monument to the country’s deeply-loved former president, Juan Perón, lies unconvincingly fallow. Then there are the railroad tracks severing […]

The Sea Breeze That Kills

People living near Hong Kong’s massive container port are being subjected to life-threatening levels of sulphur dioxide, says the author of a new government report on marine pollution that will be released later this year. Scientists, environmentalists and even the shipping industry accuse the Hong Kong government of dragging its feet in regulating pollution from […]

Posted in: Asia Pacific, Environment, Transportation by Christopher DeWolf Comments Off on The Sea Breeze That Kills , ,

Night at the Typhoon Shelter

On a pleasantly warm evening last November, my thoughts wandered over to the nighttime activity at the Sai Wan pier and I wondered if the same sort of thing happened at the nearest bit of waterfront to my apartment, the New Yau Ma Tei Typhoon Shelter. I grabbed my camera, stepped out of the door, […]

End of the Line

At the southeastern corner of Brooklyn’s Red Hook neighborhood — the cape that put the Hoek in the area’s original Dutch name, Roode Hoek — almost nothing is used according to its original purpose. A rail barge has been repurposed as a waterfront museum, a warehouse has become a massive Fairway supermarket, some streetcar tracks […]

New West and the Fraser River

Like the Saint-Laurent, Vancouver’s Fraser is a workhorse of a river. Industrial islands and seemingly endless log booms make for an interesting and active landscape, very different from the bulk of imagery one typically sees of Vancouver’s waterfront. These photos were taken from above in November, 2007.

Posted in: Canada by Desmond Bliek Comments Off on New West and the Fraser River , , ,